Adams stays ahead, but Garcia surges to second in first tally of ranked-choice votes

NEW YORK — Eric Adams barely held onto his lead in New York City’s Democratic mayoral primary after voters’ lower-ranked candidates were accounted for on Tuesday. He now outpaces Kathryn Garcia by just 2.2 points with more than 120,000 absentee ballots left to count. Those ballots will decide the race, with Adams up by just 15,908 votes. Garcia, the city's former sanitation commissioner, overtook Maya Wiley for the second place spot once the city’s Board of Elections tallied 11 rounds of ranked-choice voting Tuesday. The system, being used for the first time, allowed voters to pick up to five candidates in order of preference. Once a candidate is knocked off, their votes are spread out to the remaining hopefuls. The absentee ballots will be factored into another tabulation next Tuesday before the board releases a final certification by July 12. Adams, the Brooklyn borough president, has now secured just over 51 percent of the vote, up from the 31.7 percent he received in first-place votes when New Yorkers hit the polls last Tuesday. Wiley, former counsel to outgoing Mayor Bill de Blasio, finished in second place last week with 22.2 percent, but fell to third before being eliminated in the rankings. She trailed Garcia by less than 1 point, meaning that the leaderboard could easily change once again when the paper ballots are opened. Her voters appeared largely to support Garcia over Adams, delivering the former sanitation commissioner enough votes to come within striking distance of Adams. Fourth place went to Andrew Yang — who had campaigned with Garcia in the days before last week’s primary and urged his supporters to rank her second.

Adams stays ahead, but Garcia surges to second in first tally of ranked-choice votes

NEW YORK — Eric Adams barely held onto his lead in New York City’s Democratic mayoral primary after voters’ lower-ranked candidates were accounted for on Tuesday.

He now outpaces Kathryn Garcia by just 2.2 points with more than 120,000 absentee ballots left to count.

Those ballots will decide the race, with Adams up by just 15,908 votes.

Garcia, the city's former sanitation commissioner, overtook Maya Wiley for the second place spot once the city’s Board of Elections tallied 11 rounds of ranked-choice voting Tuesday.

The system, being used for the first time, allowed voters to pick up to five candidates in order of preference. Once a candidate is knocked off, their votes are spread out to the remaining hopefuls. The absentee ballots will be factored into another tabulation next Tuesday before the board releases a final certification by July 12.

Adams, the Brooklyn borough president, has now secured just over 51 percent of the vote, up from the 31.7 percent he received in first-place votes when New Yorkers hit the polls last Tuesday.

Wiley, former counsel to outgoing Mayor Bill de Blasio, finished in second place last week with 22.2 percent, but fell to third before being eliminated in the rankings. She trailed Garcia by less than 1 point, meaning that the leaderboard could easily change once again when the paper ballots are opened. Her voters appeared largely to support Garcia over Adams, delivering the former sanitation commissioner enough votes to come within striking distance of Adams.

Fourth place went to Andrew Yang — who had campaigned with Garcia in the days before last week’s primary and urged his supporters to rank her second.